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#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth

Breast cancer is often thought of as something that only affects women, but men can get it in rare cases. It develops in the small amount of breast tissue men have behind their nipples.
In the UK, 319 men were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017, compared with around 46,000 women, according to the Office for National Statistics.

Signs of breast cancer in men include:
• a lump in the breast – this is usually hard, painless and does not move around within the breast
• the nipple turning inwards (inverted nipple)
fluid oozing from the nipple (nipple discharge), which may be streaked with blood
• a sore or rash around the nipple that does not go away
• the nipple or surrounding skin becoming hard, red or swollen
• small bumps in the armpit (swollen glands)

Find out more on Nhs.uk

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#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth

Today is Breast Cancer Now’s wear it pink day. Every Breast Cancer Awareness Month, #WearItPink brings together thousands of people on one day, all with the same aim – to wear pink, raise money and help make life-saving breast cancer research happen.

Here at Bosom Friends we rely on donations no matter how small. Would you consider donating to us during October???
We are totally volunteer based and all our money goes back into breast cancer ladies, gifts, or funding extras for the hospital including the recent training in areola tattooing for two breast cancer nurses.

If you choose, you can donate here or via the Facebook link.
uk.virginmoneygiving.com/charity-web/charity/finalCharityHomepage.action?charityId=1015106

Thank you 💕
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Do NOT tag the lady in this post - she is happy to share her words, but wishes to stay anonymous.

Have you had some ‘nice’ remarks when you got diagnosed???

Read one ladies story.....

‘Are you actually sure, you’re so healthy, I think you should go back for a second opinion’ ‘I’m not sure I can actually touch you’ ‘You’re too young for all this’ ‘Maybe you’ve done too much running’ ‘Your job is too stressful, you work far too many hours’ ‘Woah it’s not in your family, I thought that’s how you caught cancer’ ‘Do you think it’s because you breast fed the twins or maybe had the kids too close together’ ‘It has a lot to do with your ethnic group, like you probably eat a lot of bacon’ ‘Do not go anywhere near your husbands new shop, you’ll scare the customers, especially with it being a food business’ ‘Is your cancer one of those calcium cancers’ ‘You’re so lucky to have some time off work’ ‘How do you think you’ll cope financially, will you have to sell your house’ ‘I bet if you don’t have reconstruction you won’t feel like a real woman’ ‘Do you think Hubby will mind and still find you attractive’

These were things that people said to me just after I was diagnosed, during my treatment and most recently. All said with genuine care and not wanting to cause me any upset.

1 in 2 people in the UK born after 1960 will be diagnosed with some form of cancer during their lifetime. Females have the highest lifetime risk of breast, lung and bowel cancers. Males have the highest lifetime risk of prostate, lung and bowel cancers.

Cancer does not care how rich you are, how glamorous you are. If you’ve got a job interview next week or if this is just the one more thing you can’t cope with right now.

We have to start having an upfront, totally honest conversations about cancer to challenge all those perceptions and myths. Sadly cancer can happen to anyone at anytime! But if it’s caught early the chances of survival and recovery are brilliant.

#girlsvscancer #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
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HUGE thanks to David from C-Physio who introduced us to the joys of Pilates this evening.

David qualified as a physiotherapist in 2004, earning an honours degree in physiotherapy from the University of East London. He began his career at Airedale NHS Trust, developing an understanding of patient care before moving into the private sector. In 2008, he established C-Physio, and since then the clinic has grown and expanded both its team of physiotherapists and the services it offers.

Tonight, we started off with chair exercises then progressed to standing ones.

This is the second time David has joined us, and we hope he will return again!
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#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
What is secondary (Metastatic) breast cancer?

Secondary breast cancer occurs when breast cancer cells spread from the first (primary) cancer in the breast through the lymphatic or blood system to other parts of the body. Secondary breast cancer is not the same as breast cancer recurrence.

This is not often spoken about but this infographic video from Breast Cancer Now explains more.

Find out more information here: bit.ly/2IGcDgI
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It’s #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
Meet Angela, she was diagnosed with Breast Cancer after finding a lump.

Remember to #CheckThoseBreasts once a month to see what’s normal for you. Any changes? See your GP. Be Breast Aware!

Please ❤️ or 😮 our posts or eve give us a share - we can’t help others if they don’t know we’re out there.
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It’s #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
Meet Cath, one of our previous models from our Annual Fashion Show. Cath was diagnosed at a routine mammogram, had her treatment, then later found strength in bodybuilding .... yes you read that right!

www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/news/17948089.cancer-survivor-cath-hayes-bodybuilding-journey/
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Roll up roll up - get your tickets for the event of 2019
The annual Bosom Friends Fashion Show!

What makes this special? All our ladies are going through breast cancer, some are living beyond that diagnosis.
This evening shows these ladies how to enjoy themselves, feel great, confident and look amazing!

It truly is an emotional night and a thrilling show.

Tickets are £7 each and are available from any of our models, committee members or by messaging our page. They are also available on the door (if we don’t sell out!)

www.facebook.com/events/934701136874502?sfns=mo

#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
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#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth

If you have close relatives who have had breast cancer or ovarian cancer, you may have a higher risk of developing breast cancer.

However, because #breast #cancer is the most common cancer in women, it's possible for it to occur in more than one family member by chance.

Most cases of #breastCancer do not run in families, but particular genes known as BRCA1 and BRCA2 can increase your risk of developing both breast and ovarian cancer. It's possible for these genes to be passed on from a parent to their child.

Other newly detected genes, such as TP53 and CHEK 2, are also associated with an increased risk of breast cancer.

If you have, for example, 2 or more close relatives from the same side of your family – such as your mother, sister or daughter – who have had breast cancer under the age of 50, you may be eligible for surveillance for breast cancer, or genetic screening to look for the genes that make developing breast cancer more likely.

If you're worried about your family history of breast cancer, discuss it with your GP.

(Nhs.uk)
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#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
This video uses lemons to help you look at your breasts! It is from the US and is aimed at a woman, or man, that has symptoms. Check out more at knowyourlemons.com

Thank you Bradford and Pennine Breast Screening for the info 💕

#BTHFT
#CheckYourBreasts
#BosomFriends

Don’t forget to ❤️ or 😮 our posts and a share would be lovely too 💕
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Breast cancer can have a number of symptoms, but the first noticeable symptom is usually a lump or area of thickened breast tissue.

Most breast lumps are not cancerous, but it's always best to have them checked by your doctor.

You should also see your GP if you notice any of the following:

a change in the size or shape of one or both breasts
discharge from either of your nipples, which may be streaked with blood
a lump or swelling in either of your armpits
dimpling on the skin of your breasts
a rash on or around your nipple
a change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken into your breast

It's important to be breast aware so you can pick up any changes as soon as possible.

Get to know what is normal for you – for instance, your breasts may look or feel different at different times of your life. This will make it much easier to spot potential problems.
(Nhs.uk)

#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth
#BreastCancerAwareness
#BTHFT
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#BreastCancerAwarenessMonth

Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in the UK. Most women diagnosed with breast cancer are over 50, but younger women can also get breast cancer.
(Taken from Nhs.uk)

How old were you when you heard the words “You have breast cancer” ???

#BTHFT
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It’s #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth, so we’re posting every day in October

As a small, independent, registered charity, WE NEED YOUR HELP!
We have been running for over 30 years but still need to get Bosom Friends name out there - we can’t support those with Breast Cancer if they don’t know we exist! We’re not exclusive to Bradford... we will support anyone!

Our group is 100% run by volunteers who have all had a breast cancer diagnosis themselves. We find this is beneficial as we have a great understanding of others fears and apprehension.

Please like our page, if you haven’t already,
Invite your friends and share our posts.

Even better if you use the ❤️ or 😮 reactions on our posts to help them get seen more.

Thank you 💕

#BTHFT #CheckYourBreasts
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It’s #BreastCancerAwarenessMonth, so I am trying to post something breast related every day....

If you've experienced the menopause and are overweight or obese, you may be more at risk of developing breast cancer.
This is thought to be linked to the amount of oestrogen in your body, as being overweight or obese after the menopause causes more oestrogen to be produced.

Why not join Miss Tait (one of our #BTHFT breast cancer surgeons) in a park run on the 2nd November, at Lister Park!
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